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13 Mar 2017
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Revd Steve
02 Mar 2017


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The Trinity

16 Jun 2014

Rev 4/Jn 3 Trinity

Throughout history mankind has tried to “describe” The Trinity by best identifying God as only one God, but being also three persons, i.e; Father, Son and Holy Spirt. Many have tried to describe a mystery but sadly fell fail of creating a heresy. What we can learn about The Trinity is by way of what The Trinity has revealed, i.e, the scripture, and scripture reveals what God is not before it releases what or who God is. Not only scripture brings revelation but Church history has left sufficient ecclesiastical documents enabling us to do so too. Each time someone tried to describe the trinity they would use various analogies; tho sin turn only helped to confuse and divert believers away from the truth of who God is, for example:

One explanation of The Trinity is given where God is like water, you can find water in three different forms; liquid, ice and vapour. This is ‘modalism’ an ancient heresy confessed by teachers such as Noetus and Sibelius who say that God is NOT three distinct persons but that he merely reveals himself in three different forms, this heresy was condemned at the first council of Constantinople in 381 ad and those who confess it cannot be considered part of the church catholic (world wide, notice small c not capital C).

Another heresy described The Trinity as being like the sun, the sky and a star, where the star is also the light and the heat. This is aeairianism. A theology that states that Christ and the Holy Spirit are creations of the father and are not one in nature with him. Exactly how like heat and light are not the star itself but are merely creations of the star.

And then we have the three leaf clover analogy, which is Partialism. A heresy which asserts that father, son and holy spirit are not distinct persons of the godhead but are different parts of God. Each composing one third of the divine. A modern example would be a transformer where 3 cars form one giant robot.  In reality the trinity is a mystery that cannot be comprehended by human reason and is understood only through faith and is best confessed in the words of the Athenian creed which says ‘we worship one God and trinity and trinity in unity neither confusing the person nor dividing the substance that we are compelled by the christian truth to confess that each distinct person is God and Lord and the deity of the father, son and holy spirit is one, equal in glory, co-equal in majesty.’

Now we have some incline of who God is, we will identify more of who God is by way of what God DOES. In short, Father, Son and Holy Spirit are a conversion minded family on mission. God the father sends his son, Jn 3:16 “God so loved the world that he gave his son (here is the mission)”

Jesus fulfils his task by dying on our behalf. (here is obedience to the mission) And then Jesus promises the gift of the Holy Spirit in the upper room John 14:26;15:26;16:13; and Acts 1; who empowers us so that we fulfil Christ’s command to “Go into all the world and make disciples, baptising them in the name of the Father, Son and Holy Spirit”  We know it as ’The Great commission’ 

The Trinity are a family on mission and the church is to reflect this as we too are a mission family. So, in short, if the world wants to know who God is, God is a trinitarian God of there persons co-equal who are on mission to seek and save the lost. The Church, God’s body here on earth, is God’s representative. Mission, therefore is God’s DNA, it should therefore be ours.

Steve

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